For Family

Parents of Pregnant Teens #6 – If She Wants to Parent, What is My Role?

Parents of Pregnant Teens #6 – If She Wants to Parent, What is My Role?

Your role is whatever your daughter needs from you and whatever you are comfortable with. These are things you and your daughter will want to talk over before the baby arrives. Ideally, she should initiate these conversations, but if she doesn’t, here are some questions you can ask:

  • What is your plan for childcare when you go back to work after the birth?
  • How do you plan to juggle school and childcare?
  • What is the baby’s father going to contribute to childcare?
  • How are you going to provide for the baby? Are there expenses you’re not sure if you can cover?
  • What do you expect from me/us (as your parents)?
  • What is your plan for childcare when you want to go hang out with friends/do something social?
  • Do you plan to move out and get your own place or stay at home? (If that is an option.)

Now, there are many more questions that are going to come up, but if you clear some of the things above up with her before the due date, you are less likely to come to misunderstandings after the birth. To not make it sound like an interrogation, try to space these questions out. read more

Parents of Pregnant Teens #5 – Resources I Can Guide My Daughter To

Parents of Pregnant Teens #5 – Resources I Can Guide My Daughter To

Below are other resources that she may need to support her pregnancy, her choices for her pregnancy, and parenting resources if she decides to parent.

Medical Insurance:

  • Medicaid for pregnancy – contact your state chapter by clicking here to see if your daughter qualifies.
  • Healthcare.gov – if she is not on your insurance, does not qualify for Medicaid, and is 18+ years, she can find subsidized insurance here – call 1-800-318-2596 or apply online here.
  • Locally, the best place to contact for questions regarding Medicaid eligibility is Pueblo Step Up. Pueblo Step Up will expedite the Medicaid application process and help your daughter get back-dated coverage if she qualifies.

Adoption resources:

  • National Council for Adoption – general information on adoption, more on infant adoption specifically, and an adoption agency search.
  • American Adoptions – information on choosing adoption for the baby or you can call 1-800-236-7846 for more information (open 24/7).
  • ACPC also has several staff who are trained as Certified Adoption Specialist, so we can provide referrals to our trusted adoption affiliates so that you know your daughter is working with a safe adoption organization. Learn more about how we can help connect your daughter with adoption resources here.

Food assistance:

  • Food Stamps – this is a federal program to help low-income families keep healthy food on the table. Find out more and see if your daughter qualifies here.
  • Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) – this is a federal program for pregnant women and children up to age 5 to help provide access to healthier food choices to support good nutrition during pregnancy and in early childhood. Find out more and see if your daughter qualifies here.
  • Food Banks – search for your local food bank here.

Childcare assistance:

Housing assistance:

  • Federal Housing Administration (FHA) – housing counseling, help to find rent assistance or Section 8 housing, and more. Call 1-800-225-5342 or visit their website.
  • Maternity Homes – use a Google search for “maternity homes near me” or “[my city, state] maternity home” to find a local, caring place for your daughter to move through her pregnancy in case the home environment is not safe or for personal reasons. If you cannot find one or want help locating one, give our toll-free & confidential helpline a call at 1-800-672-2296.

Schools for pregnant teens:

  • Your daughter’s current school should have information about whether or not continuing school there is possible during pregnancy, or if there is a school nearby specifically for pregnant teens.
  • Many larger cities now have “pregnancy schools,” so do an online search to find one near you.

GED Programs:

  • Many community colleges or city programs offer free or low-cost GED programs. Call your local schools and organizations to find out locations.
  • There are many free online GED programs and review classes that your teen could take advantage of. Do a Google search or talk to your local high school to find a trusted and accredited program.

Parenting classes/material assistance/support groups:

  • What is a huge expense for parents? DIAPERS. Find diaper banks here. Local churches (and sometimes food banks) are able to provide some diapers for women in need.
  • Your daughter and the father of the baby can earn diapers on a weekly basis when they participate in ACPC Life Services.  Call or text 719.544.9312 to sign up.

Need to talk?  We can help mediate a conversation or just answer any questions you have.

Call or text us at 719.544.9312

We have also put together some helpful information and resources right here on our blog that may be of some help to you during this process:

How to Talk to the Baby’s Father – For Parents with a Pregnant Teen

Helping Her Make a Decision for the Pregnancy – For Parents with a Pregnant Teen

Challenges of Being a Parent of a Teen Mom – For Parents with a Pregnant Teen read more

Parents of Pregnant Teens #4 -Challenges Of Being The Parent Of A Teen Mom

Parents of Pregnant Teens #4 -Challenges Of Being The Parent Of A Teen Mom

What you’re about to go through for the next 9 months plus is not going to be easy, but with good communication, you and your daughter will find a way to make things work. Listed below are some of the most common tension points that typically come between a parent and a pregnant teenager, as well as ideas on how to minimize the tension.

Finances

This seems to be one of the most common arguments among pregnant teenagers and their parents – who is paying for what? That is exactly why we suggest sorting it all out at the beginning of the pregnancy. Think about each aspect, write it out and come to an agreement, and sign it. That way, if a disagreement ever does come up, you can refer back to the “contract” and settle it then and there. Here are some topics you might want to cover in a discussion: read more

Parents of Pregnant Teens #3 – Helping Your Teenager Make a Decision for her Pregnancy

Parents of Pregnant Teens #3 – Helping Your Teenager Make a Decision for her Pregnancy

If you just found out that your teen daughter is pregnant, ultimately, the decision of what do with the pregnancy is in your daughter’s hands. This may be hard to swallow.

After 14+ years of raising her, you probably know her pretty well (though she might deny it). This means that you will be able to help her sort through her options while knowing a little better than a counselor about her hopes, dreams, morals, and desires.

How does she feel about being a teen mom? Adoption? Abortion? Hear her out, and of course, you can insert your opinion too and explain your reasoning. You might help her realize things she hadn’t even considered. But make sure you really hear her out before you give her any input. read more

Parents of Pregnant Teens #2 – How to Talk to the Baby’s Father

Parents of Pregnant Teens #2 – How to Talk to the Baby’s Father

If you just found out that your teen daughter is pregnant, you might be tempted to think it is mostly the boyfriend’s fault, and in some cases, you’d be correct. But in many cases, the sex that led to the pregnancy is consensual. The most important thing to do before making any suggestions or comments about how you feel about the situation is to take time to really listen to what both he and your daughter says about the situation, making sure to get her thoughts on what happened before you talk to him. read more

My Teenage Daughter is Pregnant – Parents of Pregnant Teens #1

My Teenage Daughter is Pregnant – Parents of Pregnant Teens #1

Whether you have a suspicion that your teenage daughter could be pregnant or she just broke the news to you, your head is probably spinning with a million different thoughts and emotions. How could this happen? What do we do now? Who is the father? What will other people think?

This is to be expected, precisely because you were NOT expecting this. You might be angry, disappointed, and/or scared. Scratch that – you are definitely angry! If you’re her father, you are probably one second away from speeding down the street to have a “chat” with your daughter’s boyfriend. If you’re her mother, you may be thinking, how in the world is my daughter going to handle a pregnancy?! Or, you are wishing you had just one more of those “birds and the bees” chats. read more

What Can Family Do?

What Can Family Do?

Is someone in your family facing an unplanned pregnancy?

Learn how you can be supportive.

It can be shocking to find out that your daughter, niece, sister, granddaughter or cousin is pregnant.  And once the shock wears off, you’ll probably experience a wide range of emotions.  But this life-changing experience is an opportunity for you to make a huge difference in the life us someone you love.

Call us to learn how you can help her.

Listen.

Try to set aside your feelings so you can truly hear what your family member is saying. Observe her emotional and physical health as pregnancy affects her. Remind her that this is not the end of her future. You can be a positive voice for her dreams, even if those dreams are changing. read more